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Craft: Jewellery Simple Netted Necklace

This netted bead necklace pattern has been with me my entire crafting journey. My first dips into crafting were with jewellery making. I strung some beads on a string and I was hooked. Granted, my repertoire of techniques has certainly expanded. But putting beads on a string makes for a quick craft with very pretty results.



This netted necklace will take you a little longer. It took me about 3 hours or so. Ok, I was working slowly. Too distracted watching Bridgerton, which lead to some mistakes. Then I had to undo the pattern and start again from there. It is not a glorious story of jewellery making on my part, but that is what my afternoon was like. And what better way to spend the cold dark afternoons of the holidays while you are in lockdown. Coffee, crafts and Netflix are what I will choose anytime.

So here is what I used

 

The pattern construction was a bit of a challenge. I based it on a pattern I found years ago in a book and built it from memory. Some end results were not coming out as I imagined. (Lookout on my Instagram for those.) But I kept trying until I had the pattern down and working. And here is the pattern:

I worked on 2 Strands. There are tutorials on how to do it with one. But I think two strands are easier to work with. The shorter strand needs to be long enough to go around the neck and will serve as a base. The long strand is about 4 times the length of your base length. This should just be enough to create the netted pattern

With a crimp bead and a clamp, I fastened both strands at one end and added a jump ring and a lobster clasp. Then strung beads on the shorter strand and secured it with a stitch marked. Because putting a clamp and crimp bead do not always fit over a knotted beading string, I used a stitch marker so I can easily undo the knot.

I will talk about braids and loops now. They might not be the most accurate technical terms. But they describe what I mean.

As you see, every braid is made up of loops. I highlighted the connecting beads. The connecting beads in a loop connect two braids.

I found that keeping the connecting beads spaced between an even number helped me to get the ratio and pattern right more easily. Of course, you can increase the number of beads between the connecting beads. As a beginner, I would recommend this: Keep the number of beads in one loop the same, as well in that row.

If you do not you might find it difficult to create a neat, netted pattern. Or you might find string exposed or the pattern gathering at one part in a way that makes the necklace not sit quite right on the neck.

Colour-wise, I chose to use a different colour for every connecting bead. Of course, using one colour will give the necklace a lovely lacey look.  You could also use completely different

beads as connecting beads. There are those beads in the middle of the last loop you could easily replace with a drop-shaped bead or any other bead to add some more eye-catching elements and length.

What I like with this netted necklace pattern is, that it gives you some freedoms. Starting with the necklace your braids do not need to be made of three loops. You can start with one loop followed by a braid of two loops and so on. The length of the braids can be increased by adding more loops.

When I finished the netted pattern, I loosened the knot and stitch marker strung the clamp and then the crimp bead. Fastened the crimp and then the clamp and attached the adjustment chain.

That is it.

Have you ever dipped your toes into jewellery making? What is your favourite piece of jewellery?
I would love to read about your thoughts in the comments

If you created netted bead necklace yourself, do not forget your creation on Instagram with the hashtag #craftjournaler

Feel free to roam about and find more ideas on this blog. How about some Upcycles?

Until I see you next time remember: Keep colourful and craft more :-)